•   Social Distancing Efforts Appear to be Working to Slow the Spread of COVID-19

     

    Maricopa County data shows a slower rise in hospitalizations 

     

     PHOENIX (April 8, 2019)—Maricopa County Department of Public Health data is showing that the number of COVID-19 hospitalizations is growing at a slower rate since the end of March than in the weeks prior. This is likely attributed to the protective measures individuals and the community are taking to slow the spread of disease.  

    “When we look at the hospitalization epidemiology curve, we can see that the number of new severe COVID-19 cases is not growing as rapidly as it was several weeks ago,” said Dr. Rebecca Sunenshine, medical director for disease control at Maricopa County Department of Public Health. “This tells us that, while the number of severe cases is still increasing, we have started to flatten the curve in Maricopa County.  

    “This is important because, while this will not stop disease from occurring, it will spread it out more evenly over time so we have enough healthcare resources to give people the best healthcare when they need it,” Sunenshine added. 

     Download the graphic on what you can do to flatten the curve.

    Social distancing is avoiding those outside of your household as much as possible and maintaining at least 6 feet of distance between others when you are out in public. A few examples of acceptable activities while practicing social distancing include:  

    • Phone calls and video chats 
    • Walks around your neighborhood while keeping 6 feet between you and others 
    • Virtual book clubs 
    • Online workouts 
    • Video chats over coffee or meals to replace having coffee or meals together in-person 

     

    If you think you might be sick with COVID-19 or have been exposed to COVID-19, please immediately isolate yourself from others in your household. Symptoms include:  

    • Fever 
    • Cough 
    • Shortness of breath 
    • Body aches 
    • Sore throat 

    If you are sick, have been around someone who is sick, or are caring for someone who is sick, please see  https://www.maricopa.gov/5512/Sick-or-Exposed-to-COVID-19 for details on what you can do to protect yourself and those around you.  

    For more information on COVID-19 and what you can do to stop the spread, please visit www.Maricopa.gov/COVID19 for English or www.Maricopa.gov/COVID19es for Spanish.  

                                                                                                

      The Seasonal Flu

    Almost every child gets the flu (influenza) from time to time and it usually between October and May. The rates of infection are highest among children, and flu symptoms can last a week or longer. For most people, the flu can cause fever, cough, sore throat, headache, chills, muscle aches, and fatigue. Some people (especially those who have other illnesses) can get much sicker, and can develop symptoms such as high fever or pneumonia. On average, about 36,000 people die each year from influenza. Most respiratory viruses are spread through droplets in the air (by coughing and sneezing) so it is best to have your child stay at home when they have these symptoms. Educating your children to cough and sneeze into their inner elbows and good hand-washing will greatly decrease the spread of flu's and viruses. 

    The Flu shot:

    Flu shots are now available and covered by most insurances.  There are two types of seasonal influenza vaccine: inactivated (killed) vaccine which is given by an injection (shot), and live attenuated (weakened) vaccine that is sprayed into the nostrils. Because influenza viruses are always changing, scientists try and develop a vaccination that will match the viruses most likely to cause the flu that year.

    Recommendations:
    It is recommended that everyone older than 6 months receive flu vaccine. Children younger than 9 years old who have never received a flu shot need to receive 2 doses of vaccine at least 1 month apart. The live attenuated vaccine that is given as a nasal spray should not be given to children under 2 years of age, children with asthma, children on long-term aspirin treatment, or children younger than 5 who have experienced wheezing in the past year.  The following people should get the inactivated flu shot:
    Adults 50 years of age and older
    Children between 6 months and 2 years of age (Children younger than 6 months should not get either influenza vaccine).
    Children younger than 5 with asthma or one or more episodes of wheezing within the past year.
     People who have long-term health problems with:
    o heart disease
    o kidney or liver disease
    o lung disease
    o metabolic disease, such as diabetes
    o asthma
    o anemia, and other blood disorders
     Anyone with certain muscle or nerve disorders (such as seizure disorders or cerebral palsy) that can lead to breathing or swallowing problems. Anyone with a
    weakened immune system.
     Children or adolescent

     Anyone with certain muscle or nerve disorders (such as seizure disorders or cerebral palsy) that can lead to breathing or swallowing problems. Anyone with a
    weakened immune system.
     Children or adolescents on long-term aspirin treatment.
     Pregnant women.
    Tell your doctor if you ever had Guillain-Barré syndrome (a severe paralytic illness also called GBS). You may be able to get the vaccine, but your doctor should

    help you make the decision.
     

    Some people should talk with a doctor before getting either influenza vaccine:
     Anyone who has ever had a serious allergic reaction to eggs or another vaccine component, or to a previous dose of influenza vaccine. Tell your doctor if
    you have any severe allergies.
     People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting flu vaccine. If you are ill, talk to your doctor or nurse about
    whether to reschedule the vaccination. People with a mild illness can usually get the vaccine.

    o heart disease
    o kidney or liver disease
    o lung disease
    o metabolic disease, such as diabetes
    o asthma
    o anemia, and other blood disorders
     Anyone with certain muscle or nerve disorders (such as seizure disorders or cerebral palsy) that can lead to breathing or swallowing problems. Anyone with a
    weakened immune system.
     Children or adolescents on long-term aspirin treatment.
     Pregnant women.
     

    What are the risks?: Getting influenza is much riskier than getting the influenza vaccine. However, a vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing problems, such as severe
    allergic reactions. The risk of the influenza vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.
    Inactivated Influenza Vaccine:
    Mild problems:
     soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given
     fever
     aches
    If these problems occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1-2 days.
    Severe problems:

     Life-threatening allergic reactions are very rare. If they do occur, it is within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot.
     
     American Academy of Pediatrics  10/03/13