• Grade 5 ELA & Math Performance Descriptors

    This is the descriptors provided parents for each level of performance

     

    Content Strand/Reporting Category Statements

    Reporting Category

    Text

    Reading for Information

         

    Students find two or more main ideas and their supporting details in a text. They tell about the relationships between people and ideas in a text. They find similarities and differences in the points of view and organization of texts. They use many sources to answer questions.

    Reading for Literature

    Students find a theme of a story from its details. They compare and contrast characters in the same story and themes in different stories. They explain how different parts of a story fit together. They tell how media can be used to tell a story.

    Writing and Language

    Students write to give information or state opinions. They do research using information from many sources. They use commas correctly. They use different verb tenses in their writing. They use clues in the text to find the meaning of new words and figurative language.

     

    What These Results Mean

    Reporting Category

    Text

    Reading for Information – Below Proficient

    Your student may have trouble finding the main ideas and supporting details in a text; finding the differences between different authors’ points of view; finding the relationship between two ideas or events in a text; and finding similar information from two texts on the same topic.

    Reading for Information – At/Near Proficient

    Your student is often able to summarize a text; find its main ideas and supporting details; tell about the relationship between historical or scientific events or ideas; show how an author uses details in the text to support a point; and answer questions using information from two texts.

    Reading for Information – Above Proficient

    Your student almost always uses details from a text to make conclusions; finds similarities and differences between the points of view of texts on the same topic; uses clues in the text to figure out the meaning of new words; and answers questions using information from many sources.

    Reading for Literature – Below Proficient

    Your student may have trouble finding the theme and supporting details in a text; understanding the figurative meaning of words and phrases used in a text; finding the narrator’s point of view; and finding the similarities and differences between two characters or settings in a story.

     

    Reading for Literature – At/Near Proficient

    Your student is often able to summarize the key events of a story and figure out its theme; tell the difference between the literal and figurative meaning of words in a text; find similarities and differences in the themes of two similar stories; find the narrator’s point of view.

    Reading for Literature – Above Proficient

    Your student almost always tells how a narrator’s point of view affects how events develop in a story; explains how media can be used to support the meaning or tone of a text; finds similarities and differences in the themes of two similar stories and between characters in a story.

    Writing and Language – Below Proficient

    Your student may have trouble organizing writing for a specific purpose (like giving an opinion); writing a clear introduction and conclusion; using commas correctly; using different verb tenses correctly; using clues in a text to find the meaning of new words.

    Writing and Language – At/Near Proficient

    Your student is often able to organize writing for a specific purpose (like to give information or give an opinion); provide facts or details to support his or her writing; use verb tenses correctly to show different times or order of events; use commas correctly; spell words correctly.

    Writing and Language – Above Proficient

    Your student almost always uses information from many sources to write for a specific purpose (like to give an opinion); uses clues in sentences or word parts to figure out the meaning of new words; understands the meaning of figurative language (like similes or metaphors).

     


     

     

    AzMERIT ELA 3–5 Writing Essay Performance Text (Informative/Explanatory)

    Dimension 1: Grades 3–5

    ELA

    Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    NS

    Your student earned no score out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay was difficult to read or written in a foreign language. The response was off-topic or unrelated to the purpose.

    ELA

    Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    1

    Your student earned 1 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay may be related to the topic but does not stay focused. It may be very brief or often drift from the main idea. The main idea may be confusing or unclear. The response has little structure. It may use very few or no transitions. It may also include extra ideas unrelated to the topic.

    ELA

    Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    2

    Your student earned 2 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay stays on topic but may drift sometimes. The topic is stated, but it does not continue throughout the essay. The main idea may be unfocused. The response has a weak structure with many mistakes. There is inconsistent use of transitions. Ideas are unclear as the response moves from beginning to end.

    ELA

    Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    3

    Your student earned 3 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay mainly stays on topic. The response is focused, but some ideas may be unrelated. The response is organized and has structure with some minor mistakes. There are some transitions used to explain relationships between ideas. It has an adequate progression of ideas and an acceptable beginning and end. 

    ELA

    Statement of Purpose/Focus and Organization

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    4

    Your student earned 4 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay stays on topic. The main idea is clearly stated and strongly maintained. The response has a clear structure and effective organization. There is a variety of transitions used to explain relationships between ideas. It has a logical progression of ideas and an effective beginning and end.

    Dimension 2: Grades 3–5

    ELA

    Evidence/
    Elaboration

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    NS

    Your student earned no score out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay was difficult to read or written in a foreign language. The response was off-topic or unrelated to the purpose.

    ELA

    Evidence/
    Elaboration

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    1

    Your student earned 1 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay includes details and facts that minimally support the main idea. This evidence is weakly connected to the main idea and not integrated into the response.  The words used are not appropriate for audience and purpose. 

    ELA

    Evidence/
    Elaboration

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    2

    Your student earned 2 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay includes details and facts that somewhat support the main idea. This evidence is somewhat connected to the main idea and unevenly integrated into the response. The words used are sometimes inappropriate for audience and purpose.

    ELA

    Evidence/
    Elaboration

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    3

    Your student earned 3 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay includes details and facts that adequately support the main idea. This evidence is connected to the main idea and generally integrated into the response. The words used are appropriate for audience and purpose.

     

    ELA

    Evidence/
    Elaboration

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    4

    Your student earned 4 out of 4 possible points. Your student’s essay includes details and facts that effectively support the main idea. This evidence is strongly connected to the main idea and smoothly integrated into the response. The words used are clearly appropriate for audience and purpose.

    Dimension 3: Grades 3–5

    ELA

    Conventions/

    Editing

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    0

    Your student earned 0 out of 2 possible points. Your student’s essay shows a lack of understanding of sentence formation and other conventions. There are many mistakes in spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.  These mistakes make the meaning or main idea of the response unclear.

    ELA

    Conventions/

    Editing

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    1

    Your student earned 1 out of 2 possible points. Your student’s essay shows some understanding of sentence formation and conventions. There is inconsistent use of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules.

    ELA

    Conventions/

    Editing

    3–5
    (Informative/Explanatory)

    2

    Your student earned 2 out of 2 possible points. Your student’s essay shows an understanding of sentence structure and language conventions. The response has few errors in punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

     

     

    Grade 5 Math

    Content Strand/Reporting Category Statements

    Reporting Category

    Text

    Numbers and Operations in Base Ten and Algebraic Thinking

    Students read, write, round, and compare decimals to thousandths. They add, subtract, multiply, or divide decimals to hundredths. They write and find the value of numerical expressions and use given rules to create patterns. Students can find relationships between two patterns and graph ordered pairs. They can multiply multidigit numbers. They solve, represent, and explain four-digit by two-digit division problems using place value, multiplication, equations, or arrays.

    Numbers and Operations - Fractions

    Students add and subtract fractions with different denominators (bottom number), including mixed numbers. They multiply fractions, including proper, improper, and mixed numbers, and solve division word problems with fractions or mixed numbers as answers. Students create and use models to explain multiplication and division story problems with fractions. They find the area of rectangles with side lengths that include fractions, by using unit squares or multiplying.

    Measurement, Data, and Geometry

    Students convert measurements within the same system (like metric) and use conversions to solve multistep, real world problems. They find the volume of solid figures using unit cubes, multiplication, and formulas. They plot ordered pairs on a graph and use graphs to solve problems. They understand that properties create categories and subcategories of flat shapes and can name flat shapes based on properties (number of sides, parallel, perpendicular, types of angles).

     

     

    What These Results Mean

    Reporting Category

    Text

    Numbers and Operations in Base Ten and Algebraic Thinking – Below Proficient

    Your student may have trouble writing and finding the value of expressions using correct operations and mathematical symbols, including parentheses; explaining and using patterns when multiplying and dividing by powers of ten; reading, writing, rounding, and comparing decimals to thousandths; and solving multidigit multiplication and division problems using place value, relationships between operations, equations, and models (area and array models).

    Numbers and Operations in Base Ten and Algebraic Thinking – Proficient

    Your student often writes numbers using powers of ten; adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides decimals to hundredths using strategies like place value, properties, and relationships between operations; and solves and explains multidigit multiplication and four-digit by two-digit division problems. Your student often creates two patterns using given rules; finds relationships between the patterns; and graphs the ordered pairs that result from the two patterns. 

    Numbers and Operations in Base Ten and Algebraic Thinking – Above Proficient

    Your student almost always multiplies multidigit numbers fluently; solves four-digit by two-digit division problems and explains strategies using equations, arrays, or area models; explains patterns related to the number of zeros in an answer when multiplying and dividing numbers by powers of ten; adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides decimals to the hundredths; and creates two patterns using given rules, finds relationships between the patterns, and graphs the patterns.

    Numbers and Operations - Fractions – Below Proficient

    Your student may have trouble understanding that fractions are the division of the numerator (top number) and denominator (bottom number); estimating to check if an answer to a fraction problem is reasonable; solving fraction word problems with different denominators using models and equations; and explaining how results change when you multiply a number by a fraction greater than one compared to multiplying by a fraction less than one.

    Numbers and Operations - Fractions – Proficient

    Your student often solves fraction word problems with different denominators (bottom number); solves division word problems with fractions for answers; creates and uses models to explain story problems for multiplication and division fraction problems; uses the relationship between multiplication and division to divide unit fractions (1 as the numerator, or top number) and whole numbers by each other; and finds the area of rectangles with side lengths that include fractions.

    Numbers and Operations - Fractions – Above Proficient

    Your student almost always adds and subtracts fractions with different denominators (bottom number) by finding common denominators; uses estimation (benchmark fractions) to check if the answer to a fraction problem is reasonable; uses equations or models to represent and explain fraction problems; divides unit fractions (1 as numerator or top number) and whole numbers by each other; and finds the area of rectangles with side lengths that include fractions.

    Measurement, Data, and Geometry – Below Proficient

    Your student may have trouble understanding that volume is a property of solid figures and can be measured using unit cubes; relating volume and multiplication; and breaking apart solid figures into rectangular prisms, finding the volume of each, and using addition to find the volume of the entire solid figure. Your student may have trouble converting measurements within the same system; making line plots; graphing ordered pairs; and naming flat shapes based on properties.

    Measurement, Data, and Geometry – Proficient

    Your student often converts measurement units within the same system (like yards to inches); makes line plots of measurement data; plots ordered pairs and uses graphs to solve real world problems; and names flat shapes based on their properties (number of sides, types of angles, and parallel and perpendicular sides). Your student often understands concepts of volume, like solid shapes have volume, volume can be measured in unit cubes, and volume is related to multiplication.

    Measurement, Data, and Geometry – Above Proficient

     

     

    Your student almost always plots ordered pairs on graphs and uses graphs to solve real world problems; makes line plots to show measurement data in fractions (,,); finds the volume of solid figures by using unit cubes, multiplication, and formulas; understands that properties of flat shapes create categories and subcategories; and names flat shapes based on properties like the number of sides, types of angles, equal sides or angles, and parallel or perpendicular sides.