•  Public Curriculum Guides

    Please use the Public Curriculum Guides provided to see our current pacing, essential standards along with standards by unit, and list of resources and expectations.

    We do utilize Open Education materials; videos, articles, and online experiences. You will see them listed in the curriculum guides sorted by unit with the links if you would like to preview these materials.

    We are always looking and finding more materials and they go through a district curation process before being approved.

    Kindergarten

    Children as Citizens

    Through an introduction to civics, geography, economics, and history, students will understand their roles and responsibilities as citizens within their own context. Students will also learn about their own culture and how it impacts understanding of oneself and others as well as be introduced to aspects of our National culture.

    ● Importance of rules and responsibilities

    ● Individual roles in a community

    ● Personal decision-making

    ● Familiarity with geographic models

    ● Culture in the home, school, and community

    ● American symbols, holidays, and traditions

    DVUSD Kindergarten Public Curriculum Guide


    1st Grade

    Communities: Living and Working Together

    Through the study of civics, geography, economics, and history, students will understand how a community functions and how each member contributes to the community for the common good. Students will study their local community and learn about characteristics that define urban, suburban, and rural communities. Democratic principles and participation in government are introduced. Community resources, environment, change over time, and cause/effect are examined.

    • Understanding perspectives of others

    • Effects of human movement

    • School and community functions of government

    • Cooperation and compromise

    • Earning, spending, and saving money

    • American symbols and traditions

    • Using geographic models

    DVUSD 1st Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    2nd Grade

    The World Around Me

    Through the study of geography and economics, the students’ lenses expand to learn how their world is interconnected globally. Students will develop a spatial understanding of the world around them so they can understand how other cultures and civilizations are interconnected and have influenced who we are as a community, state, and Nation. United States history, world history, and civics will also be taught in a comparative context. This storyline integrates well with the English Language Arts standards at this grade level since most districts have students read fables, folktales, and stories from the United States and around the world. The standards in second grade are skill-based and are designed to integrate the skills with the study of any region or civilization in the world since the individual curriculum for ELA is varied throughout the state.

    • Working together to solve problems

    • Influence of weather and climate

    • Individual and leadership roles

    • Development and change of civilizations and cultures

    • Identifying regions using geographic models

    • Societal institutions and their belief systems

    • Earning, spending, and saving money in a global community 

    DVUSD 2nd Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    3rd Grade

    Arizona Studies (prehistoric to present day)

    Students will study Arizona with an integrated approach considering the following factors:

    ● The contributions of various cultural and ethnic groups including the 22 Indian Nations that reside in Arizona

    ● Economic, political, and geographic elements

    ● Structure of the state and local governments

    ● Roles and responsibilities as citizens of Arizona

    ● Examination of primary and secondary sources including written and oral histories, images, current events, and artifacts

    ● Disciplinary skills and processes including change and continuity over time, multiple perspectives, using and understanding sources, and cause and effect

    DVUSD 3rd Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    4th Grade

    Regions and Cultures of the Americas -Pre-contact Americas to European settlements up to 1763

    Students will study the Americas (North, Central, and South America along with the Caribbean Islands) using an integrated approach considering the following factors:

    • Theories about the first peopling of the Americas

    • The development of Mesoamerican and South American civilizations including the Olmec, Inca, Maya, and Aztec

    • American Indian life in the Americas prior to European exploration including the peoples in the Southwest, Pacific Northwest, nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (EasternWoodland)

    • The causes and consequences of European exploration and colonization

    • The environmental, political, and cultural consequences of the interactions among European, African, and American Indian peoples in the late 15th through 17th centuries

    • Regional settlement patterns, significant developments, and life in the Southern, Middle, and New England colonies

    • Roles and responsibilities as members of a society

    • The contributions of various cultural and ethnic groups to the development of the Americas

    • Examination of primary and secondary sources including written and oral histories, images, and artifacts

    • Inclusion of historical fiction, picture, books, graphic novels, in addition to informational text

    • Disciplinary skills and processes including change and continuity over time, multiple perspectives, using and understanding sources, and cause and effect

    DVUSD 4th Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    5th Grade

    United States Studies - American Revolution to Industrialism - 1763 to 1900s

    Students understand the history of the United States within an integrated approach considering the following factors:

    • Historic and economic events from American Revolution to Industrialism including but not limited to the American Revolution, Constitutional Convention, westward expansion, Civil War and Reconstruction, and growth of industrial and urban America looking at origins, founders, and key political, economic, and social figures as they relate to the events outlined above such as technological developments, urbanization, territorial expansion, industrialization, political parties, and universal suffrage

    • Creation of the Constitution and the principles within the document including historical and philosophical influences, influence of state constitutions, Articles of Confederation, compromises and ratification debates at the Constitutional Convention, Bill of Rights, limited government, popular sovereignty, federalism, rule of law, checks and balances, and separation of powers

    • Development and structure of the national government including the Preamble, the three branches, examples of powers granted to each branch, powers granted to the states and individuals, the Bill of Rights, and current issues in regard to federalism and rights

    • Influence of immigration including push/pull factors, industrialization, urbanization, diversification of the population, and debates over immigration • Contributions of various cultural and ethnic groups to the changing social and political structure of the United States

    • Roles and responsibilities as citizens of the United States including participation in the political system

    • Examination of primary and secondary sources including written and oral histories, images, and artifacts with special attention being given to founding documents including the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and amendments, and landmark Supreme Court cases

    • Inclusion of historical fiction, images, books, graphic novels, in addition to informational texts

    • Disciplinary skills and processes including change and continuity over time, multiple perspectives, using and understanding sources, and cause and effect

    DVUSD 5th Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    6th Grade

    Global Studies - World Regions And Cultures Of The Eastern Hemisphere - Early Civilizations to Renaissance & Reformation

    The content focus will be viewed through geographic and historical lenses. Sixth-grade students will understand the cultural, religious, economic, and political systems of selected societies in the Eastern Hemisphere. Regions in the Eastern Hemisphere include the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia (east, south, and southeast), and Oceania. A course on world regions and cultures can be approached from many angles and perspectives.

    There are many topics to pursue in 6th grade. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process. Educators may choose to take a regional approach, a thematic approach, or a historical approach to the content.

    • Beginnings of human society such as early hominid development, peopling of the earth, and the Neolithic Revolution

    • Early river civilizations such as Mesopotamia, the Nile River Valley, the Indus River Valley, and the Yellow River Valley

    • World religions including, but not limited to Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, Sikhism, and Taoism, (origins, founders, major tenets, practices, and sacred writings)

    • Classical civilizations such as Greek, Roman, Persian, and Chinese (political, social, religious, and economic systems)

    • Rise and fall of empires and the impacts to the region

    • Growth of trade networks across the Eastern Hemisphere and impacts such as cultural exchange and diffusion, inventions, ideas, diseases, and languages

    • Development of feudal systems in medieval Europe and Japan

    • Different civilizations in the Eastern Hemisphere during the Middle Ages with regards to political, social, religious, and economic systems

    • Origins, accomplishments, and geographic diffusion of the Renaissance and the Reformation

    • Ancient and modern geography of the Eastern Hemisphere

    • Examination of primary and secondary sources including written and oral histories, images, and artifacts

    • Disciplinary skills and processes including change and continuity over time, multiple perspectives, using and understanding sources, and cause and effect

    DVUSD 6th Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    7th Grade

    Integrated Global Studies

     The content focus will be viewed through historical and geographic lenses. Seventh-grade students will understand the relationships and interactions between societies and cultures in both the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. United States history will be taught as it intersects with global issues.

    There are many topics to pursue in 7th grade. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process.

    ● Influence of the Scientific Revolution on innovation and the Enlightenment on the concept of rights

    ● Revolutions around the world such as the American Revolution, French Revolution, Russian Revolution, the Cultural Revolution (Mao Zedong), and Latin American Revolutions

    ● Global imperialism and its lasting consequences on regional conflict, stability, indigenous peoples, human movement, including slavery and involuntary migrations

    ● Impact of industrialization and the rise of organized labor

    ● Global depressions

    ● World War I and World War II including the time period between the wars with the rise of fascism

    ● Cold War including origins, nuclear deterrence, andoutcome

    ● Global conflicts and their consequences such as the Korean War, Vietnam War, Arab-Israeli Conflict, and Gulf War

    ● Government and economic systems such as monarchy, dictatorship, theocracy, oligarchy, aristocracy, democracy, constitutional republic, anarchy, and capitalism, socialism, and communism including founders, major tenets, practices, and writings

    ● Examination of primary and secondary sources including written and oral histories, images, and artifacts

    ● Disciplinary skills and processes including change and continuity over time, multiple perspectives, using and understanding sources, and cause and effect

    DVUSD 7th Grade Public Curriculum Guide


    8th Grade

    Citizenship and Civic Engagement in Today's Society

     The content focus will be viewed through civic and economic lenses. Citizenship and civic engagement will be taught through inquiry. Eighth-grade students will make connections between historical and current/recent issues as a base for implementing change in society. Students will recognize and practice their roles and responsibilities as both American and global citizens. United States History will focus on the major events that have their roots in the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and subsequent amendments.

    There are many topics to pursue in 8th grade. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process.

    ● Foundations of the United States government stemming from historical events such as the American Revolution and Civil War

    ● Constitution including structure, function, and principles

    ● Formal institutions such as Congress, the courts, the presidency, and linkage institutions such as media, elections, interest groups, polling, and political parties

    ● Historical and current legislation and landmark Supreme Court cases

    ● Civil rights movements throughout American history such as African-Americans, Latinx, Asian-Americans, women, American Indians, LGBTQ individuals, persons with disabilities, youth, and the elderly

    ● Immigration

    ● Amendments to the Constitution that have expanded the right to vote and equal protection under the law

    ● Social movements and issues both historical and current including the constitutional principles and structures (amendments, courts, Congress, and executive orders) that spur, promote, and protect these movements

    ● Human rights and genocides including treaties and organizations that promote human rights and a study of the nations and leaders that abuse human rights and/or support genocide (In addition to the study of the Holocaust, other genocides should be studied.)

    ● Environmental issues

    ● Information and media age including digital citizenship and media literacy

    ● Terrorism both domestic and international and how it influences citizens’ safety and rights

    ● Examination of primary and secondary sources including written and oral histories, images, and artifacts

    ● Disciplinary skills and processes including change and continuity over time, multiple perspectives, using and understanding sources, and cause and effect

    DVUSD 8th Grade Public Curriculum Guide 


    High School Required Courses


    World History & Geography Public Curriculum Guide   (1 credit for Graduation)

    Using inquiry in history high school students explore a variety of peoples, events, and movements in world history with a focus on inquiry into the impact of social, geographic, political, and economic influences on historical events. A world history course should include the study of the peoples of Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. A balanced approach to the Eastern and Western Hemispheres is needed for a comprehensive study of world history topics. It is recommended that the course begin with the 15th century to allow for depth of content and connection to current issues and events. A world history course can be organized in a variety of ways including thematic, chronological, regional, or through case studies. The course should include but is not limited to the following topics of study:

    There are many topics to pursue in a World History course. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process.

    • World Belief Systems including but not limited to Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, Sikhism, Taoism, and as well as non-religious worldviews and ideologies (origins, founders, major tenets, practices, and sacred writings). Topics may include but are not limited to beliefs about the origins of the universe, political correctness, humanism, secularism, monotheism, polytheism, agnosticism and atheism.

    • Interregional interactions including but not limited to European exploration, the trans-African and trans-Atlantic slave systems, and land and oceanic trade systems

    • Revolutions in thought

    • Industrial Revolution including impact on both industrialized and non-industrialized nations and the origins of modern economic systems such as capitalism, communism and socialism including influential figures

    • Political Revolutions such as French Revolution, Russian Revolution, Latin American Revolutions, and the Chinese Cultural Revolution.

    • Global rise of Nation-States including both western and non-western states

    • World War I, inter-war period, and World War II including causes, characteristics, and consequences; such as the world-wide depression, rise of fascism, totalitarianism, the spread of communism, and nationalism in China, Turkey, and India

    • Holocaust and other genocides

    • The Cold War including origins, the emergence of the Soviet Union and communist China, conflicts such as the Korean War, space race, arms race, and its impact on third world countries, and the collapse of the Soviet Union and its impact on the international community

    • Global imperialism, decolonization, democratization, and its legacy Asia, Africa, and Latin America

    • Contemporary global issues including but not limited to global terrorism, globalization, human rights, regional conflicts, population, environmental issues, technology and information age


    American History w/ Arizona History Public Curriculum Guide   (1 credit for Graduation)

    Using inquiry in history, high school students explore a variety of peoples, events, and movements in United States history with a focus on inquiry into the evolution of American democratic principles, changes in society, economic and geographical development, and the emergence of the United States as a global power. A United States history course can be organized in a variety of ways including thematic, chronological, regional, or through case studies. Special attention should be paid to how Arizona and its diverse cultures and individuals contribute to United States history. It is expected that students in elementary and middle school will have analyzed events, documents, movements, and people in Arizona and United States history from the colonial period through contemporary U.S. History. It is recommended that this course maximize time in a manner to allow for depth of content and connection to current issues and events. The course should include but is not limited to content from the following historical eras:

    There are many topics to pursue in an United States/Arizona History course. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process.

    • Revolution and a New Nation including but not limited to causes of the American Revolution, reasons for American victory, impact of the Revolution on politics, economy, and society, and the creation of the American political system looking at origins, and key political and social figures

    • Nation Building and Sectionalism including but not limited to territorial expansion and its impacts on external powers and Native Americans, regional tensions due to industrialism, immigration, and the expansion of slavery, changes in the political democracy after 1800, and cultural, religious, and reform movements in the Antebellum period

    • Civil War and Reconstruction including but not limited to causes, course, and impact of the Civil War on various groups in the United States, the impacts of different reconstruction plans, and the emergence of Jim Crow and segregation

    • Emergence of Modern America including but not limited to industrialization, immigration and migration, progressivism, Federal Indian Policy, suffrage movements, racial, religious and class conflict, the growth of the United States as a global power and World War I and its aftermath

    • Great Depression and World War II including but not limited to social, political, and economic changes during the 1920’s, the role of government, impact of the depression on diverse groups of Americans, the New Deal, and the cause and course of World War II, the character of the war at home, and the impacts of the war on the United States

    • Postwar United States including the economic boom and social transformation of the United States, the Cold War, the impact of conflicts in Korea and Vietnam, domestic and international policies, and the struggle for civil rights and equality

    • Contemporary United States including but not limited to domestic politics and policies, economic, social and cultural developments, growing international conflict and tension, 9-11 and responses to terrorism, environmental issues, poverty, globalization, nuclear proliferation, and human rights


    Government w/ Arizona History Public Curriculum Guides   (.5 credit for Graduation)

    Using inquiry in civics, high school students explore how to become active citizens. To become engaged citizens requires a knowledge of the history, principles, and foundations of our republic. A comprehensive study of civics can be approached from many angles and perspectives with a focus on inquiry. A civics course can be organized in a variety of ways including thematic, chronological, or chrono-thematic. The course should include content from the following topics:

    There are many topics to pursue in in a Civics/Government course. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process and to educate students about the roles and responsibilities of citizenship.

    • Foundations of government including but not limited to the historical foundations and philosophical foundations of the American political system, the purpose and role of government, and where government gets its authority

    • Structures and function of tribal, local, Arizona and other states, national, and international governments including but not limited to constitutional vs. non-constitutional governments, and how governments are organized, limits and powers of the legislative, judicial, and executive branch, and comparative governments

    • Institutions of the national government including but not limited to Congress, the President and the bureaucracy, federal courts; and institutions of the state government including the legislature, governor and the bureaucracy, and the state courts

    • Law-making process including the role of deliberation and compromise

    • Media, interest groups, and political parties including but not limited to the how these linkage institutions connect the people to government and shape political and social interests, the role of the free press in the American political system, the origin and role of political parties, the two-party system, the role of third parties in American politics, and the social, political, and economic positions of American political parties in history and the present day

    • Media Literacy including but not limited to roles of media, types of media, and media and consumer biases

    • Elections, voting, and voting behavior including but not limited to political socialization, creation of legislative and congressional districts, opportunities for participation, campaigns, types of elections including primary process and general election process (local, state, and federal), laws governing elections, voter turnout, and barriers to voting

    • Citizenship including rights, roles, and responsibilities of a citizen and the process for naturalization

    • Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

    • American political culture, values, and principles that are basic to American constitutional democracy and the republic such as individual rights, popular sovereignty, common good, patriotism, rule of law, freedom of conscience and expressions, privacy and civil society, justice, representative government, checks and balances, freedom of religion, civilian control of the military, and equality

    • Public policy including researching current issues or policies at the local, state, or federal level

    • Foreign Policy including but not limited to formation and implementation


    Economics Public Curriculum Guide   (.5 credit for Graduation)

     Using inquiry in economics, high school students explore the economic reasoning process to make informed decisions in a wide variety of contexts. Economics is grounded in knowledge about how people, institutions, and societies choose to use resources to meet their wants and needs. The study of economics can be approached from many angles and perspectives with a focus on inquiry. A comprehensive economics course should include content from the following topics:

    There are many topics to pursue in an Economics course. LEAs should identify topical emphases to allow for depth of study needed to effectively engage student/learners in the inquiry process and to educate students about economic decision making.

    • Financial Literacy/ Personal Finance including but not limited to budgeting, saving, spending, investment, credit, banking, and insurance

    • Economic Reasoning including but not limited to the concepts of scarcity, factors of production, opportunity costs, and cost-benefit analysis

    • Economic systems including but not limited to command, mixed, and free market, and economic philosophers and theories, including but not limited to Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and John Maynard Keynes

    • Exchange and Markets including but not limited to supply and demand, private property rights, competition, incentives, entrepreneurship, prices, the invisible hand, competition and institutions in the private and public sector

    • The National Economy including but not limited to fiscal and monetary policy, GDP, unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and distribution of wealth

    • The Global Economy including but not limited to trade, tariffs, and exchange rates

     

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    Kindergarten

    Publisher: Harcourt

    Title: Our World

    Available: In-class text only

    Kindergarten

     

     

     

    1st Grade

    Publisher: Harcourt

    Title: A Child View

    Available: In-class text only

    1st Grade

     

     

     

     

    2nd Grade

    Publisher: Harcourt

    Title: People We Know

    Available: In-class text only

    2nd Grade Text

     

     

    3rd Grade

    Publisher: Harcourt

    Title: Our Communities

    Available: In-class text only

    3rd Grade text

    Some schools will also supplement with the older 4th grade materials - not enough to make this the official adoption as the books are out of print.

    Arizona

    4th Grade

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: United States Early Years

    Available: In-class consumable textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    4th Grade

     

     

     

     

     

    5th Grade

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: United States History

    Available: In-class consumable textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    5th Grade

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    6th Grade

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: Discovering Our Past - A History of the World

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    6th Grade

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    7th Grade

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: Discovering Our Past - A History of the World

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    6th Grade

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    8th Grade

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: Discovering Our Past - A History of the United States

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    8th

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    World History & World History Honors

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: World History * Geography

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    World History

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    American History

    Publisher: McGraw Hill

    Title: United States History & Geography

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on our startpage.dvusd.org under McGraw Hill.

    American History

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Government

    Publisher: Pearson

    Title: Macgruders American Government

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on Power School.

     American Government

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Economics

    Publisher: Pearson

    Title: Economics

    Available: In-class textbook available, Online materials are found inside the student Canvas course or on Power School.

     Economics