• 6th Grade Social Studies/English Language Arts

    Mr . Freelove

    Sunrise Elementary

    andrew.freelove@dvusd.org

    Room 801

    Classroom Supplies List 

    In this course in addition to building content knowledge and historical thinking skills, an emphasis will be placed on building organizational skills as well as reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. To that end it is important for students to come to class every day prepared and equipped with the following course materials. 

    1. ____ (2) ½ inch 3 ring binder for history & ELA class 
    2. ____ 5 Dividers 
    3. ____ (2)100 page college ruled spiral notebook 
    4. ____ 200 Sheets of Regular College Ruled Paper 
    5. ____ Pens/pencils 
    6. ____ Glue Stick 
    7. ____ 1 Set of Colored Pencils 
    8. ____ At least 3 colors of highlighters 
    9. ____ 1 Ruler 

    * All students should have these supplies by Friday, August 8th at the latest.

     

    SOCIAL STUDIES: World Regions & Cultures 

    (Early Civilizations-Renaissance-Reformation)

    Objectives: Students in sixth-grade world history and geography classrooms learn about the earliest humans, the development of tools, the foraging way of life, agriculture, and the emergence of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, ancient Israel, the Indus River valley, China, Mesoamerica, and the Mediterranean basin. Although teachers should keep the focus on ancient events and problems, this course gives students the opportunity to grapple with geography, environmental issues, political systems and power structures, and civic engagement with fundamental ideas about citizenship, freedom, morality, and law, which also exist in the modern world.

    Historical Skills: Historians investigate how and why things happen in society. Students in grade Six will learn how to analyze primary and secondary sources, research, reason and communicate like a historian.  Students practice history as an interpretive discipline, learn how to analyze multiple points of view, cite evidence from sources, and make claims in writing and speaking based on that evidence. They collect evidence from multiple sources to try to develop a better understanding of the world. After reviewing the quality and credibility of their sources, they develop an overarching story about people and events. This class will emphasize the importance of critical thinking, reading with a purpose, selecting credible information, weighing multiple perspectives, debate and discussion, writing effectively, and constructing an argument. Students will be expected to perform individual work and participate in group work.

     

    Course Outline 

    Unit 

    Title 

    Dates

    Intro

    Familiarization

    Aug 3-12

    Early Humanity: Paleolithic Period

    Middle East (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Hebrew)

    Aug 15 – Sept 2

    Mesoamerica (Aztec, Mayan, Inca)

    Sept 6 – Sept 23

    Asia (China, India)

    Sept 27 – Oct 21

    Greece

    Oct 24 – Nov 18

    Break

    Fall Break

    Nov 21-25

    Rome

    Nov 28 - Dec 16

     

    Coin Project 

    Dec 16

    Break

    Winter Break

    Dec 17 - Jan 2

    Middle Ages

    Jan 3–27

    Feudal Japan

    Jan 30 – Feb 15

    Scientific Revolution

    Feb 16 – March 10

    Break

    Spring Break

    March 11-19

    Renaissance

    March 20 – April 14

    10 

    Reformation

    April 17 - May 12

     

    Research Paper Project

    May 12

    END

    Final Week 

    May 15-19

     

    Grading Policy

    Students will be given an academic grade, an effort grade and a citizenship grade. Grading each semester will be based on the following categories. We will have weekly assessments as well as unit assessments which include essays, exams, quizzes, projects, discussions, and presentations. 

     

    1st Semester (5 units)

    Assessment (exam/quiz) 30%

    Participation (DBQ, in class assignments/discussion/note taking) 30%

    Assignment (DBQ, homework, essays) 30%

    Semester Project (coin project) 10%

     

    2nd Semester (5 units)

    Assessment (exam/quiz) 30%

    Participation (DBQ, in class assignments/discussion/note taking) 30%

    Assignment (DBQ, homework, essays) 30%

    Semester Project (argumenative essay research project) 10%

     

    English Language Arts

    Objectives: Students in sixth-grade English Language Arts classrooms will learn reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, and knowledge of language.  The class has a focus on literacy, which gives students the opportunity to grapple with citing evidence, identifying themes, understanding figurative language, presenting claims/ideas, and writing essays (argumentative, informative, narrative).

    ELA/Literacy Skills: Literacy is a fundamental aspect that everyone experiences on a daily basis through speaking, reading, and writing. Many tasks in future occupations require a person to evaluate/summarize key information to apply to other tasks. Students in Grade Six will read informative texts and be able to identify key components from that text. A constant sharpening of the mind by practicing reading is a leap in literacy that impacts various other disciplines.

     

    Course Outline 

    Unit 

    Title 

    Dates

    Intro

    Familiarization - Module 1 (W 3,4,5)

    Aug 3-12

      1 

    Modules: 2(RL3 RI1,2 W 4 W 5)3(RL 1,3,5) 4(W 3,4,5)  5(RL 1,2)

    Aug 15 – Sept 2

    Modules: 6(RL 1,5,9)  7(RL 1,4,6) 8 (RL 6)

    Sept 6 – Sept 23

    Modules: 9(W3,4,5 L4,5) 10(RI3,4,5) 11(RI1,2,3,5,7,9)

    Sept 27 – Oct 21

    Myths - Modules: 28 (RI 1,2,3,5), 29 (RL 1,2,4,5) 30 (RL 1,2,3,9) 34 (RL 1,9)

    Oct 24 – Nov 18

    Break

    Fall Break

    Nov 21-25

    Percy Jackson Book Analysis (RL 1-7,9,10) (W 2,4-6,8,9) (L 3-6)

    Nov 28 - Dec 16

    Break

    Winter Break

    Dec 17 - Jan 2

    Modules: 12(RI1,2,4,5) 13(RI1,2,4,5)14(RI1-7,9)

    Jan 3–27

    Modules: 15(RI 1,3, RL1, W2,4,9) 16(RI 1,3, RL1, W2,4,9) 17(RI 1,3, RL1, W2,4,9, SL1,2)

    Jan 30 – Feb 15

    Modules: 18(RI4, RL1,2,6) 19(RI1,2,8) 20(SL5,6)

    Feb 16 – March 10

    Break

    Spring Break

    March 11-19

    Modules: 21(RI1,6,8,9) 22(RI1,4,6, W1) 23(W1,6,8)

    March 20 – April 14

    10 

    Giver Book Analysis (RL 2,3,6, W3)

    April 17 - May 12

    END

    Final Week 

    May 15-19

     

    Grading Policy

    Students will be given an academic grade, an effort grade and a citizenship grade. Grading each semester will be based on the following categories. We will have weekly assessments as well as unit assessments which include essays, exams, quizzes, projects, discussions, and presentations. 

     

    1st Semester (5 units)

    Assessment (exam/quiz) 30%

    Participation (DBQ, in class assignments/discussion/note taking) 35%

    Assignment (DBQ, homework, essays) 35%



    2nd Semester (5 units)

    Assessment (exam/quiz) 30%

    Participation (DBQ, in class assignments/discussion/note taking) 35%

    Assignment (DBQ, homework, essays) 35%





    Learning Contract 

    A contract is an agreement between two or more people to perform a duty. The contract below explains each person’s responsibilities in relation to the learning process. Read and initial by the following statements to indicate that you agree to fulfill the expectations listed. 

    Teacher Expectations 

    1. To come prepared with an engaging lesson plan. ____ 
    2. To treat students with respect ____ 
    3. To inform students about their progress ____ 
    4. To provide a safe place for students to learn ____ 
    5. To enforce classroom and school rules ____ 

    Student Expectations 

    1. To listen to instructions carefully ____ 
    2. To bring my materials everyday ____ 
    3. To treat my teachers, classmates and parents with respect ____ 
    4. To complete all my assignments and make up work when absent ____ 
    5. To have a positive attitude and exhibit proper behavior ____ 

    Parent Expectations 

    1. To make sure that their child completes her homework EVERY DAY. ___ 
    2. To stay informed about the child’s progress towards graduation. Do NOT wait for the school or the teacher to contact you before asking about how they are doing in class. ____ 
    3. To provide a quiet place and a time that is consistently set aside for studying ___ 
    4. To make sure the child gets adequate nutrition and rest. ___ 
    5. To enforce rules and deliver consequences to motivate positive behavior. ____