• Welcome to 8th Grade English! 

     

    October

    Theme:  The Thrill of Horror

    Readings: (from the Collection textbook): The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe, The Monkey's Paw, Scary Tales, What is the Horror Genre?, Man-Made Monsters by Daniel Cohen

    Vocabulary:

    Dramatic Irony - Storytellers use dramatic irony as a useful plot device for creating situations where the audience knows more about the situations, the causes of conflicts and their resolutions before leading characters or actors. Used as a tool to sustain and excite the reader.

    Point of View - The narrator's perspective from which the events are depicted (first-person, third-person, etc.). The vantage point from whic ha story is told.

    Narrative Writing - Writing that conveys experiences, either real or imaginary, using a sequence of events as its structure. Its purpose might be to inform, persuade, or entertain.

    Event Sequence - The order of events in a narrative.

    Universal Themes - themes that are found throughout the literature of all time periods.

    Myths - traditional story usually concerning some superhuman being or unlikely event that was once believed to be true.

    Textual Evidence - evidence from a text that a reader can use to illustrate ideas and support arguments.

    Analysis - detailed examination of the elements or structure of something, typically as a basis for discussion or interpretation.

    Inference - a conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning.

    Evaluate - to examine and judge carefully. To judge or determine the significance, worth, or quality of something; to assess.

    Author's Purpose - the author's reason or intention for writing a text

    Support - to uphold an argument or position through reasons and evidence.

    Connection - a relationship or association between one or more individual, ideas, or events.

    Distinction - A difference made between two or more individuals, ideas, or events.

    Central Idea - the unifying element of a piece of a text.

    Supporting Idea - An idea that explains more about a main idea.

    Standards:

    8.RL.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what he text says explicitly as well as inferneces drawn from the text.

    8.RL.2 Determine atheme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the charcters, setting, plot, and students will provide an objective summary of the text.

    8.RL.6 This month students will analyze how differences in the points of view of the charaters and the audience or reader create effects as suspense or humor.

    8.RL.7 Analyze the xtent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

    8.RL.9 Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, including describing how the material is renderd new.

    8.RI.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of wht the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

    8.RI.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; students will provide an objective summary of the text.

    8.RI.3 Analyze how a text makes conections among and istinctions between individuals, ideas, or events.

    8.RI.6 Determine an author's point of view, perspective and/or purpose in a text and analyze how the author ackowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 

    8.SL.2Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats and evaluate motives behind its presentation.

    8.W.3 Students will write a narrativeto develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective tehnique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

    Objectives:

    • Analyze writers use of dramatic irony and its purpose within stories before creating their own narrative example using dramatic irony and well-structured event sequences.
    • Analyze how a modern work draws on a universal theme and analyze its development over the course of the text.
    • Analyze the choices a filmmaker makes when he or she decides to adapt a written story to movie form.
    • Determine the author's purpose and cite the best text evience to support it.
    • Analyze how a text makes connection and distinctions between different horror stories.
    • Students will be able to determine the central idea of the text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting details, by writing a paragraph summary of the essay.

     

     For the Month of November, students will begin the book Parallel Journeys by Eleanor Ayer