• Welcome to 8th Grade English! 

    Happy New Year!

    I hope everyone enjoyed their Winter Break, and are ready to start off 2019 refreshed!

     For January and February, students will be covering Collection 3: The Move Toward Freedom in their Collections textbook. They will be reading from “Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass, an American Slave” by Fredrick Douglass, and “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh” by Ray Bradbury.  ELA classes will be reading Animal Farm, and the Advanced ELA will be reading Fahrenheit 451.

    Students will begin reading on Wednesday, January 30.  I do have books in the classroom, but if a student wishes to annotate in their book (which is strongly encourage), a book will need to be purchased for the student.

    Animal Farm by George Orwell This story is an account of a group of barnyard animals who revolt against their vicious human master, only to submit to a tyranny erected by their own kind, can fairly be said to have become a universal drama.  Project for Animal Farm: Students will be creating a diorama (save those shoe boxes!). More information/handout to follow in class.

    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities, the printed book, along with the houses in which they are hidden. Project for Fahrenheit 451: Students will be creating art! More information/handout to follow in class.

    The standards that will be covered in class are:

    8.RL.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what he text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

    8.RL.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, plot, and students will provide an objective summary of the text.

    8.RL.6 This month students will analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader create effects as suspense or humor.

    8.RL.7 Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

    8.RL.9 Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, including describing how the material is rendered new.

    8.RI.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

    8.RI.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; students will provide an objective summary of the text.

    8.RI.3 Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events.

    8.RI.6 Determine an author's point of view, perspective and/or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 

    8.SL.2Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats and evaluate motives behind its presentation.